The 7th Annual Camp and Combine

June 25, 2016 Killeen, Texas

On Saturday campers and local celebrity football players filled Leo Buckley Stadium, for the 7th time.  Children had the chance to learn from their local stars of the community.

Earlier in the day Johnny “Lam” Jones, Romance Taylor, and Roy Miller visited McLane Children’s Hospital to visit the teen center where Roy Miller was surprised by his jersey being prominently displayed in the teen lounge.  The group learned how the important the lounge  was to the kids and talked about how special the children were that they visited. RM McLane'sMiller shared some thoughts: “what struck me the most was that some kids were on hospice and made it their life goal to improve the teen center, how selfless, courageous, wise, and inspiring….Our buddy that got in the car accident (from a drunk driver) and checked on everyone else in his family before realizing he had a broken leg. RMIt can be easy to forget, how we sometimes take parts of life for granted, but when you get around the personalities of these teens, you realize they truly taking advantage of the most important qualities a human can posses; being fully present in time. They smile through it all and I will always remember that.” The Accumulative Advantage Foundation will be donating some games to McLane Children’s Hospital’s teen center. If you are interested in donating as well email us at kidsadvantage@gmail.com.

_________________________________________________________

We want to thank our sponsors, volunteers, parents, coaches, players, The Accumulative Advantage Foundation, and our camp committee for a successful weekend. You once again, inspired change. You continue to rekindle the fire that drive people in the community to unite and work hard towards community outreach. cheerThis camp requires a ton of work and time we have to thank Veshell Willis, Coach Ken Gray, Pete Curtis, Minerva & Brian Cotton, Dan Hull, Heather Lemmack, Mooky Durant, and Malcolm Adair who worked their tails off getting your free camp funded organized. For our volunteers, our foundation has fought for years to have this kind of collective support from you, we do not take it lightly. Your support truly touched our hearts. It takes a village to raise a child, as you know we are creating a cycle of successful men and women who will eventually COME BACK and GIVE BACK to their community. Join our efforts as we intend to expand our camps across the world, adding another camp next year in North Texas, bringing our total number of camps to four. Please donate your time or even money by emailing us at kidsadvantage@gmail.com. Thanks for the memories! The campers had a blast! We look forward to working with you next year to make camp even better!

-Roy Miller

Find out how you can help us throughout the year by emailing us your name and skill set.

Frank Okam: The Man, Myth, Legend

Proud supporter and board member, Frank Okam checks in with kidsadvantage.org to give us a glimpse of what he has been up to.

Frank Okam of the Accumulative Advantage Foundation most recently retired from the NFL where he finished a successful six year career. As a highly recruited prospect out of high school, his success continued into the college where Frank started all 4 years at the Univ. of Texas.  The dominate defender once known as the “Nigerian Nightmare” has seen his share of life’s ups and downs and is excited to share part of his story with us. Frank is an awesome example of what one person can do when presented with the right opportunities and platforms,  sports provide. Frank has been a proud supporter of the foundation for more than five years strong even in Killeen, TX where he has absolutely no ties to. Frank is one of the most fascinating athletes I ever played football with because of his mindset.texas_frank_okam-1 His canny ability to find the silver lining in any situation makes him shine from the crowd and I believe is the factor that will allow him to have such a long career in football.  Frank is one of the smartest people I know and most importantly, a genuine person. Frank opens up to share the other side of organized sports we all face, at some point, through our journey of life.  As young athletes we think sports will last forever,  in reality we all come to a point in life where we have to change courses, which as Frank explains, is not easy. I am proud to watch Frank and his journey through life.

“Hey guys Frank Okam here. I have been very busy lately most recently serving as a defensive graduate assistant to Rice University. This past week I was hired to be the defensive line coach at Rice.  Additionally, I am finishing my Masters in Liberal Studies and most recently presented my capstone thesis on “How coaches affect the social structure of their team and decision making of athletes”. 

Coach Okam
Coach Okam teaching young Defensive Linemen @ Rice

The reason I got into coaching was simple. I love football and what it means in comparison to life and I love the impact you can have on future generations. Coaching is a life of service that forces you to embrace all cultures and while instilling individuals with values like dedication, self worth, and creating that intrinsic movement to perform at a high level regardless of what you are doing. The mission of coaching, just like parenting is to create a better version of yourself.

One of the toughest things I had to deal with as an adult was the concept of failure. I was an all American in high school and college and I got cut from the NFL four times. As a competitor that did a number on my psyche and after I decided to stop playing it took me a while to recreate my identity. What I’ve learned now is that failure is not real. Everyday we get an opportunity to expand our consciousness and learn more about ourselves and the world around us. So in every “failure” there is a lesson, to improve yourself and others around you if you listen closely and look soberly.”

Re-Writing Killeen’s History Books

Leo Buckley Stadium July 11th, 2015

Killeen’s Mayor Scott Cosper came to the opening ceremony of the 6th Annual Camp & Combine to award the Accumulative PROCLAMATIONFoundation with the prestigious proclamation for the efforts put forward by many for the last 6 years. Our players, staff, and volunteers have worked so hard and are honored by the camp and the city’s stamp of recognition.

The always “laid back” Roy Miller celebrated with joy and was overwhelmed by the award. Roy Celebrates ProclamationRoy explains his feelings for the proclamation, “This proves that together a community can do great things. I am so happy that our team is rewarded for their work! They deserve this! This camp officially goes down in the history books of Killeen that July 10th and 11th is ours!”. We are proud of this achievement and look forward to more milestones. Please join our efforts as we are always looking to build our team of successful role models and volunteers to improve our outreach to the community. Please email us at kidsadvantage@gmail.com with your skill sets that you think can help. We look forward to working with you!

-AAF

Blog: Miller’s Mind- Roy Miller gives 5 tips to young athletes after signing the letter of intent (scholarship)

As National Signing Day looms about, Roy gives 5 tips for young athletes after signing a scholarship. In 2005 Roy Miller signed with the University of Texas to be a Longhorn after being ranked as the 34th overall best football player in the country (rivals.com). Three and a half years later he graduated and was drafted as the 81st pick in the NFL draft.

Here are his 5 tips for handling the end of the recruiting process:

I hope my tips help you handle this process well, good luck. Know that others have been through this process that you can learn from. Here’s my five simple tips I think will help you go far.

  1. Right now it is time to recognize that the fun of being recruited is over. From now until you earn the right, you are just another guy fighting for a chance to contribute on the team. All over again, you need to earn the respect of your coaches and teammates, by showing you care about the team and yourself. Be open to being patient, to learning from upperclassmen, and be resourceful by reaching out to those who have already gone through this process before, including myself (kidsadvantage@gmail.com) “as iron sharpens iron so does one man sharpen another”.
  1. Thank God, family, and influential people in your life. Celebrate with those most important to you. Do not allow friends to be first on this list. You will learn shortly after high school graduation that friends often take completely different paths in life, but family will always be there for you. Allow mom to be mom because you are getting ready to leave the nest, this is a huge marker in both you and your parents lives. Enjoy your accomplishments with them as well as the last free meals and living space you may ever have again for the rest of your life.
  1. Thank all colleges who offered you a scholarship. The power of the words “thank you” can take you further than you think. Looking back at my recruiting days, I thought that after I signed with Texas, coaches from other schools would disappear so I regretfully, never had took the time to call, thank, and appreciate them. This is one of my biggest regrets as a recruit. I was so afraid of their disappointment that I allowed the gracious offers to go unappreciated. I ended up interviewing for a few of these same coaches at the 2009 NFL combine. Making a college selection is a tough decision but college coaches are grown men and they understand your situation as well. Coaches may feel let down, but this happens every year and they deal with it and find a way to get over things. Say bye in a polite way and you keep the bridge, don’t say anything, and you leave the relationship open to interpretation. Do not burn the bridges. Coaching networks are well connected and coaches not only talk to each other and may influence your future, especially if you hope to coach later down the lines.
  1. College is no longer a dream it is a reality. If you haven’t already, begin exploring likes and interests to form a path towards a field of study. The chances of going “pro” are very slim. If you are lucky enough to get the opportunity you must know that even us NFL players say the acronym N.F.L. really means “not for long”. That being said if you are lucky enough to make it in the league, know that the average NFL career is 3 and a half years. Think back to your life three years ago, that’s how quick an NFL career can be over with. You have many more years to live after sports and that college degree is your ticket. Making it to the NFL does not guarantee wealth. The rookie salary when I came in the league was $315,000 after a 39% tax, a 3% agent fee, player dues and all your looking at half of that initial sum of money. $150,000 is a lot of money don’t get me wrong, but you cannot live the rest of your life off of this amount. Pick up a few skills that will help you find a career, and live your life. Do not be ignorant by believing you are different than anyone else, have a backup plan. Prepare yourself with a plan for playing time as well. Hopefully you will be the starter you were told you could be, but that is not up to you. You are now competing with young men that have been training a little longer than you and have a little more FBI (football intelligence) as well. A red-shirt year may be necessary for you to get accustomed to college life and balance school with sports. Just because you are “red-shirting” does not mean you are not good enough to play.
  1. Eliminate external pressure by focusing on what is better for your future, during your young career/college experience. All throughout high school you are taught to fit in with the crowd or make certain people proud. Those things are all dependent on things you cannot control I call: external pressure. Focusing on bettering you takes a large amount of pressure away and allows you to take full advantage of everything in your control. You have enough things to worry about as it is. Do not carry others weight on your shoulders. Right now eliminate all others expectations in your mind, it is a freeing experience. You do not need the pressure of making it to the “pros” or buying mom and dad a house. These things are good motivators but what if life does not unfold for you this way, does that make you are a failure? The answer is no. Success is subjective; it is a sign of success itself that you are in college. Your potential may not be becoming the next Tom Brady or Earl Thomas but you will never find out if you do not appreciate your personal progress, by giving life your best shot. Being successful in my eyes goes hand in hand with the desire to get better. Embrace this attitude to get the most out of college and life! To those of you who do not sign soon, keep fighting good things will come to you. I wish you all the best of luck!

-RM

Email Roy Miller at kidsadvantage@gmail.com with any questions.