Miller's Mind

Blog: Miller’s Mind- Roy Miller gives 5 tips to young athletes after signing the letter of intent (scholarship)

As National Signing Day looms about, Roy gives 5 tips for young athletes after signing a scholarship. In 2005 Roy Miller signed with the University of Texas to be a Longhorn after being ranked as the 34th overall best football player in the country (rivals.com). Three and a half years later he graduated and was drafted as the 81st pick in the NFL draft.

Here are his 5 tips for handling the end of the recruiting process:

I hope my tips help you handle this process well, good luck. Know that others have been through this process that you can learn from. Here’s my five simple tips I think will help you go far.

  1. Right now it is time to recognize that the fun of being recruited is over. From now until you earn the right, you are just another guy fighting for a chance to contribute on the team. All over again, you need to earn the respect of your coaches and teammates, by showing you care about the team and yourself. Be open to being patient, to learning from upperclassmen, and be resourceful by reaching out to those who have already gone through this process before, including myself (kidsadvantage@gmail.com) “as iron sharpens iron so does one man sharpen another”.
  1. Thank God, family, and influential people in your life. Celebrate with those most important to you. Do not allow friends to be first on this list. You will learn shortly after high school graduation that friends often take completely different paths in life, but family will always be there for you. Allow mom to be mom because you are getting ready to leave the nest, this is a huge marker in both you and your parents lives. Enjoy your accomplishments with them as well as the last free meals and living space you may ever have again for the rest of your life.
  1. Thank all colleges who offered you a scholarship. The power of the words “thank you” can take you further than you think. Looking back at my recruiting days, I thought that after I signed with Texas, coaches from other schools would disappear so I regretfully, never had took the time to call, thank, and appreciate them. This is one of my biggest regrets as a recruit. I was so afraid of their disappointment that I allowed the gracious offers to go unappreciated. I ended up interviewing for a few of these same coaches at the 2009 NFL combine. Making a college selection is a tough decision but college coaches are grown men and they understand your situation as well. Coaches may feel let down, but this happens every year and they deal with it and find a way to get over things. Say bye in a polite way and you keep the bridge, don’t say anything, and you leave the relationship open to interpretation. Do not burn the bridges. Coaching networks are well connected and coaches not only talk to each other and may influence your future, especially if you hope to coach later down the lines.
  1. College is no longer a dream it is a reality. If you haven’t already, begin exploring likes and interests to form a path towards a field of study. The chances of going “pro” are very slim. If you are lucky enough to get the opportunity you must know that even us NFL players say the acronym N.F.L. really means “not for long”. That being said if you are lucky enough to make it in the league, know that the average NFL career is 3 and a half years. Think back to your life three years ago, that’s how quick an NFL career can be over with. You have many more years to live after sports and that college degree is your ticket. Making it to the NFL does not guarantee wealth. The rookie salary when I came in the league was $315,000 after a 39% tax, a 3% agent fee, player dues and all your looking at half of that initial sum of money. $150,000 is a lot of money don’t get me wrong, but you cannot live the rest of your life off of this amount. Pick up a few skills that will help you find a career, and live your life. Do not be ignorant by believing you are different than anyone else, have a backup plan. Prepare yourself with a plan for playing time as well. Hopefully you will be the starter you were told you could be, but that is not up to you. You are now competing with young men that have been training a little longer than you and have a little more FBI (football intelligence) as well. A red-shirt year may be necessary for you to get accustomed to college life and balance school with sports. Just because you are “red-shirting” does not mean you are not good enough to play.
  1. Eliminate external pressure by focusing on what is better for your future, during your young career/college experience. All throughout high school you are taught to fit in with the crowd or make certain people proud. Those things are all dependent on things you cannot control I call: external pressure. Focusing on bettering you takes a large amount of pressure away and allows you to take full advantage of everything in your control. You have enough things to worry about as it is. Do not carry others weight on your shoulders. Right now eliminate all others expectations in your mind, it is a freeing experience. You do not need the pressure of making it to the “pros” or buying mom and dad a house. These things are good motivators but what if life does not unfold for you this way, does that make you are a failure? The answer is no. Success is subjective; it is a sign of success itself that you are in college. Your potential may not be becoming the next Tom Brady or Earl Thomas but you will never find out if you do not appreciate your personal progress, by giving life your best shot. Being successful in my eyes goes hand in hand with the desire to get better. Embrace this attitude to get the most out of college and life! To those of you who do not sign soon, keep fighting good things will come to you. I wish you all the best of luck!

-RM

Email Roy Miller at kidsadvantage@gmail.com with any questions.

Tim Crowder

Blog: Tim’s Simple Life Teachings

TC CampTransitioning out of the NFL was very difficult. My first year out the league was tough because I was still in limbo, I had to wait and wonder if teams wanted to sign me or not. Two years with no phone calls, I closed the door and started working on other aspirations of mine, such as athletic training. I have always had a knack for hard work, and that included a ton of training. Often at the University of Texas and in the NFL my teammates would ask me to take them through my workouts in the off-season. Instead of making it a hobby or an off-season thing, I realized I could transition from the NFL and still do what I love to do while making a living. In 2014 I started a business called Nuclear Athletes (www.nuclearathletes.com). Now, I am at so much peace because I feel like I am really making a difference in life. I am truly doing what I was put on this earth to, which is serve, mold, and love others. Plus, setting your own hours to work is the best part of being a CEO.

Coach Crowder

If I wouldn’t have taken care of my finances and saved money, I would not have had the opportunity to do what I wanted to
do after football. Often, young athletes think that once you
make it into the NFL that you are set for life, and that is
just not true. Even if you are one of those very few,
football does not last that long. Many players retire after 3
and 1/2 years around the age of 26. My friends, you have
many, many more years to live after 26. Sadly, many young
professional athletes only live in the now. Some only think
about making money just to go buy things, instead of
creating cash flow or saving it. I will finish with a little
question that I would always ask the younger guys on the
team. This question can fit for anyone in any job related
field. Would you rather be balling (in the form of money)
while you are playing (working), or would you rather be
balling when you are done playing (retired)? I never dreamed
of making it to the top in my profession and it happened. The same can happen to you. Make the right choices now before
you are put in that situation.

Tim

Miller's Mind

Blog: Miller’s Mind

2014 was an amazing year. I was awarded the Ed Block Courage Award, nominated for the NFL’s first ever Sportsmanship Award, nominated for USAA’s salute to service award, and given a 4 year contract extension by the Jacksonville Jaguars. I question myself of whether I should bring these things up and mention them, because on the surface they appear as individual achievements and those that know me, know I despise the spotlight. When I thought deeper about these accomplishments, I realized they do not celebrate me rather those that have shaped me to where I stand today. I am very grateful to God and those who have motivated and believed in me by caring more about me more than I could for myself at different parts of my life. Reflecting back on last year, I am happy that all of you who touched my life were rewarded for your work. All the volunteers/sponsors at the camps and events are worthy of the nomination by USAA and the NFL’s Salute to Service, all you who have helped build my character are owed the NFL’s Sportsmanship Award, and the list goes on. These awards are about you and I just wanted to say thank you! If I never receive another accolade on this earth, I am proud today because you are celebrated! Killeen, Austin, Ft.Hood, and many other communities came together as one, and shown the power of community, the human heart! To the children whom ever looked at those accomplishments and dreamed about them, know that life isn’t ALL about achieving your wildest dreams, if that was the case when you achieved it there would be nothing left to live for or do: you would feel empty. Life is about loving and respecting people, the journey, the ups the downs, the fight for the possibilities, the tears of watching them fade, but ultimately the journey through it all. Slow down enjoy the ride, embrace the now and if you take care of now, and fully live in it, the future has a way of working out to be where God himself, designed you to be.

RM

Juaquin Helping change lives

AAF Co-Founder: Juaquin Iglesias’ Blog: Coaching The Freshman All-American Game

Last week, I had the opportunity to coach The High School Freshman All-Americans in San Antonio. They all were hand picked by a staff of scouts. These young players are from all over the country. Many of them already ha

ve college offers and destined to be invited back to the Army All-American game three years from now.

I was given the opportunity to coach these young men by David White. David coached at the University of Oklahoma while I was playing there from 2005-2008. He offered me this opportunity and I jumped all over it because I love working with kids.

I remember being these kids age and remembered people trying to tear me down about statistics and how only so many people make it to the NFL. Those people who told me those things have stuck with me ever and motivated me ever since. Instead of harping on the negative, I choose to be the positive inspiration with each and every kid I am able to reach. Although I know statistics to have a lot of truth behind them I still would rather tell young kids that they can be anything they want to be with Hard Work, Respect, and Kindness!!!

The simple reason why I wanted to coach these young players this past week was to build relationships with them. I gave each player my contact information and hope to help them grow for years to come not only on the football field but in everyday life as well.

-JI

Jaguars Tribute To The Military

President: Roy Miller III on being Nominated for the NFL and USAA’s Salute to Service Award

It means a lot to me to be nominated as a Salute to Service Award recipient because of what these servicemen and women do for our country. Also, my Father served in the Army for over 20 years. The military community did a lot for me growing up, and it means a lot to be able to give back to this community.

I really feel like the Army did a great thing for our family. It took us out of poverty and gave us a stable life. It was a solid, safe upbringing. It gave my Dad a chance to have a respectable career and learn discipline, which he’s passed down to me. He went to work everyday at 4a.m. and came home at 5p.m. He made all kinds of different sacrifices and risked his life at war for our country. It shows you the character of this man and gave me a lot of respect for him.

I’m proud that my Father served in the military, and I’m proud of all of the things that he’s done and all of the sacrifices that he made for our family and our country. I embrace it. I could look back and pinpoint everything, but I just think he did a great job overall of showing and teaching me things. And I really think so much of it carried over to the NFL.

It’s important to me that my Dad knows how much respect I have for the servicemen and women that he’s been to war with – and did or did not come home with – and so I try to give back to the servicemembers and their dependents as much as possible. I know how stressful their lives can be and how taxing it can be on the whole family.

He sees the newspaper clippings and reads online about the work that I’m doing, and it definitely brings a smile to his face to see me giving back to these communities. Like I said, the Army has given so much to me, and I feel like it is my duty to give back.

I’m proud that our Foundation is providing kids at Ft. Hood military base in Texas, where I grew up, with opportunities to hear from people who spent time there and went on to be successful. I’m especially proud of our annual football and cheerleading camp, where we host hundreds of kids for free. And the most important part is that we have current and former NFL players and cheerleaders who grew up around Ft. Hood come back just for the camp.

Not only do we have a great showing of kids, but they also recognize the faces of the people who come back for the camp every year. And the kids listen to them because they respect the type of people they are and understand that this person is from my community and I can be like them. It really doesn’t work unless the kids get to know who these people are, spend time with them and trust them. Putting on this free camp for the two days that we do is so vital.

Growing up on a military base, you don’t really get to see consistent faces. People are coming and going, moving and getting transplanted into different communities.

There’s not really a face of the base, so to speak. So it’s hard to aspire to be something if you don’t have mentors or an understanding of the history of where you are. That’s one of the biggest issues in military communities, and I think the camp has been able to help with this, as well as provide a platform for people from the area who have gone on to be successful to come back and share their stories.

I can’t say it enough, but I think it’s really important that the NFL recognizes the vets and servicemen and women. To me, all I knew was the military. It brought so much peace to me because it was who my Dad was and what he fought for.

The military fights for us so that we could be whoever we want to be. It really means a lot to me, especially when I go back home, to see these soldiers in wheelchairs, and all of the amputees, who – thanks to them – have really allowed us to do what we love to do. I can’t thank them enough and I’m really happy that the NFL can thank these guys, like my father, like my uncles, like my brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, who all serve in the military and continue to fight for our freedom.

Staff

D-Line U Round 2 (May 16th, 2015)

May 16th is approaching soon! D-Line University is back again with even more elite NFL players from around the world! Keep up with updates here and on dlineu.eventbrite.com

UPDATES:

11/10/14:

Players committed to this years 2015 D-Line U football camp.

Lamaar Houston
One of the NFL’s most relentless pass rushers. A top free agent in 2014. Current DE for the Chicago Bears former Longhorn.

Tim Crowder
Physical pass-rusher and run stopper. A strong Leader and work-aholic. 6 year NFL veteran former All-American at the University of Texas.

Sam Acho
A physical, smart, and athletic DE/LB for the Arizona Cardinals. A rising star in the NFL former Texas Longhorn.

Alex Okafor An up and coming star in the in NFL at DE he has a unique knack for getting to the QB and in a hurry. Current Arizona Cardinal and former Texas Longhorn legend.

Brian Orakpo
All-Pro Pro Bowl DE for the Washington Redskins Texas Longhorn. A physical DE with the athleticism to drop back into coverage.

Derek Lokey A tough, physical, defensive lineman former 4 year NFL (Kansas City Chiefs) veteran and former Texas Longhorn legend.

Henry Melton
Pro-Bowl DT one of the most athletic inside rushers in the game former Longhorn legend, Current Dallas Cowboy.

Gerald McCoy
All-Pro, 3x Pro Bowler for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers, The highest paid DT in the history of the NFL, former Oklahoma Sooner legend.

Michael Bennett
One of the NFL’s premeir pass rushers Super Bowl Champion with the Seattle Seahawk an aggresive penetrator on run and pass downs. Former Texas A&M Aggie.

Corey Redding One of the NFL’s most dominate DE’s, a 12 year veteran that can play all positions on the D-Line at a high level. Current Indiannapolis Colt, legend of the University of Texas.

Tommie Harris 4 Time Pro-Bowler All Pro defensive tackle once arguable recognized as the best defensive player in the NFL. All American at the University of Oklahoma.

Roy Miller III One of the NFL’s strongest DT’s in the game the. The 6th year NFL (Jaguars) vet is a dominate run stuffer that plays with great technique and smarts, former Texas Longhorn.

Rodrique Wright Former 5 year NFL Veteran with the Miami Dolphins a big athletic phsyical DT, former All-American at the University of Texas.

Frank Okam former 5 year NFL Vet, a big physical athletic defensive lineman with several NFL teams including the Texans, former All American at the University of Texas.

Camp

5th Annual Cen-Tex Camp and Combine

350 campers filled Leo Buckley Stadium, July 11th and 12th, to participate in the Accumulative Advantage Foundation’s 5th Annual Football and Cheer-leading Camp. Kids had the opportunity to learn from over 15 local, NFL Players and Pro Cheerleaders! With so much support from volunteers, NFL PLAY 60, and some local companies, campers were able to enjoy fun activities while taking away life lessons, which go far beyond athletic competition. Kid’s were challenged to be disciplined, work hard, including cleaning up after themselves. “Killeen Ball” a game of football where every kid gets the chance to play QB and catch the ball was played, campers watched and supported the cheerleaders during their performances, ice cream and barbeque meals were provided to campers, and children got one-on-one time with our professional athletes. Our citizenship award was given away to 32 campers including 6 fastest man trophies.

This year a heart on our camps logo displayed the name: Donna. Donna helped build our foundation and had a sincere passion for the kids of Killeen. In 2013 Donna Passed away.

Donna Fischbach, you are forever in our thoughts and hearts, we celebrate and our reminded of you every time a child smiles at our camp. We are forever in debt to you, your vision lives on, rest in peace. Thank you for helping us evolve the camp to where it is today.

 

 

Thank you again to all Sponsors:

 

Sponsors
Sponsors for 2014

NFL PLAY 60, ALL AMERICAN CHEVROLET, PURE FIT FOODS, HILTON GARDEN INN, HERCULES STRENGTH & FITNESS, 360 PERFORMANCE, UNION STATE BANK, NATIONAL GUARD, YMCA, NATIONAL GUARD, KNCT CENTRAL TX SPORTS

Cloud Real Estate, Creative Child Learning Arts Academy, Killeen Ladies Lions Clubs, Seton Hospital, and Subhani Foundation.

See you in 2015!

 

AS

D-Line University: A Fun Experience

May 10th, 2014

16 NFL Players came out to host 150 kids of the Austin area, at Vandegrift H.S. Players taught position specific drills as well as life skills to encourage the younger big guys to build a sense of pride in themselves. Celebrities such as Coach Mack and Sally Brown, Jeff “Maddog” Madden, Chris Hall, Casey Studdard, and Russell Korman all came out to support.

The crowd
Kids swamp the players for autographs as parents watch.

Kids and other coaches from around Texas participated to understand the science behind each NFL  players very own techniques. What an amazing time! 2015 looks bright dlineu.eventbrite.com will eventually be open for registration.Stay tuned for updates coming soon! Thank you members, coaches, players, volunteers, and sponsors.

May 10th, 2014 Vandegrift High School Austin, TX

-Accumulative Advantage Foundation

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